[PythonistaCafe] What makes PythonistaCafe different

Hey there,

Mastering Python is *not* just about getting the books and courses to study—to be successful you also need a way to stay motivated and to grow your abilities in the long run.

Many Pythonistas I know are struggling with this.

It's simply a lot less fun to build your Python skills completely alone.

If you're a self-taught developer with a non-technical day job it's hard to grow your skills all by yourself.

And with no coders in your personal peer group, there's nobody to encourage or support you in your endeavor of becoming a better developer.

Maybe you're already working as a developer, but no one else at your company shares your love for Python.

It's frustrating when you can't share your learning progress with anyone or ask for advice when you feel stuck.

From personal experience I know that existing online communities and social media don't do a great job at providing that support network either:

Stack Overflow is for asking focused, one-off questions. It's hard to make a human connection with fellow commenters on the platform. Everything is about the facts, not the people. For example, moderators will freely edit other people's questions, answers, and comments. It feels more like a wiki than a forum.

Twitter is like a virtual water cooler and great for "hanging out" but it's limited to messages that can only be a few sentences long at a time. Not great for discussing anything substantial. If you're not constantly online you'll miss out on most of the conversations. Slack chat groups suffer from the same flaws.

Hacker News is for discussing and commenting on tech news. It doesn't foster long-term relationships between commenters. It's also one of the most aggressive communities in tech right now with little moderation and a borderline toxic culture.

Reddit takes a broader stance and encourages more "human" discussions than Stack Overflow's one-off Q&A format. But it's a huge public forum with millions of users and has all of the associated problems: toxic behavior, overbearing negativity, people lashing out at each other, jealousy, ... In short, all the best parts of the human behavior spectrum.

Eventually I realized that what holds so many developers back is their limited access to the global Python coding community. That's why I founded PythonistaCafe, a peer-to-peer learning community for Python developers.

At the center of PythonistaCafe are the core values of our community that we ask all members to adhere to.

Our core values and application process for new members create a certain type of culture in the community.

It's one of collaboration and helpfulness. It's one where you can form genuine relationships with other members, learn from one another and give back to other members who are newer. It also fosters collaboration.

An open community tends to be more guarded and cutthroat because people need to keep each other at "arms length."

You can read the PythonistaCafe Core Values at the link below:

-> https://www.pythonistacafe.com/core-values

— Dan Bader

Older messages

[Python Mastery] What does it mean to "master" Python?

Monday, June 20, 2022

Hey there, A couple of years ago I'd become quite interested in martial arts. Hours upon hours of watching "The Karate Kid" growing up must've taken their toll on me... And so, I

New Python tutorials on Real Python

Saturday, June 18, 2022

Hey there, There's always something going on over at realpython.com as far as Python tutorials go. Here's what you may have missed this past week: The subprocess Module: Wrapping Programs With

[PythonistaCafe] Q&A

Friday, June 17, 2022

Hey there, At this point you should have a pretty good idea of what PythonistaCafe is about and what makes it special. In this email I want to answer some common questions that I get asked about the

[PythonistaCafe] Why PythonistaCafe exists

Friday, June 17, 2022

Hey there, In one of my last emails I talked about how some online communities in the tech space devolve over time and turn into cesspools of negativity. This relates directly to how and why I started

[PythonistaCafe] What's in PythonistaCafe for you?

Friday, June 17, 2022

Hey there, A couple of years ago I'd become quite interested in martial arts. Hours upon hours of watching "The Karate Kid" growing up must've taken their toll on me... And so, I

HTG Deals: Get This RTX 3080 GPU For $230 Off, Plus More

Wednesday, June 29, 2022

Logo for How-To Geek Deals June 29, 2022 HTG Deals: Get This RTX 3080 GPU for $230 Off, Plus More There's a lot for gamers to love in this edition of How-To Geek deals. To finish out the month of

JSK Weekly - June 29, 2022

Wednesday, June 29, 2022

We're officially half way through 2022! Have you been productive so far? Have you implemented your plans for 2022 successfully so far? No? Well why not check out Manusha Chethiyawardhana's

🎂🎉🦾 Happy Birthday TheSequence!

Wednesday, June 29, 2022

50% OFF to celebrate our 2nd anniversary! ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌

Daily Coding Problem: Problem #803 [Medium]

Wednesday, June 29, 2022

Daily Coding Problem Good morning! Here's your coding interview problem for today. This problem was asked by Facebook. Mastermind is a two-player game in which the first player attempts to guess

FBI: Deepfakes are applying for remote tech jobs

Wednesday, June 29, 2022

Slack alternative; Enhanced Windows 11 taskbar ZDNet Facebook Twitter LinkedIn ZDNet Tech Today June 29, 2022 placeholder FBI warning: Crooks are using deepfakes to apply for remote tech jobs READ FULL

The Art of Writing Efficient Programs ($31.99 Value) FREE for a Limited Time

Wednesday, June 29, 2022

The Hacker News eBook Update Newsletter The Art of Writing Efficient Programs ($31.99 Value) FREE for a Limited Time Download For Free The great free lunch of "performance taking care of itself

T-Mobile Is Selling Your App Activity: Here's How to Opt Out

Wednesday, June 29, 2022

Did You Know?: The punctuation marks known as the em dash (—) and the en dash (–) derive their name from typesetting, because the em dash was the same width as an uppercase M and the en dash was the

Sam Altman on Y Combinator and What Makes The Best Founders

Wednesday, June 29, 2022

Hey, Nick here! In this newsletter, I curate insights and timeless principles on how to build great products. You'll improve your product skills with every issue. Here's an interview for you

Noonification: How I Let an AI Code a Game For Me!

Wednesday, June 29, 2022

Top Tech Content sent at Noon High-impact Emerging Tech Careers Advice The Noonification: Your Daily Dose of Electrifying Tech Content at Noon, by HackerNoon Hey there, 🪐 What's happening in tech

Tell us what you want to see at Disrupt

Wednesday, June 29, 2022

Vote in our audience choice program TC Disrupt - San Francisco, CA - October 18-20, 2022 Vote for the roundtable sessions you want to see most at Disrupt Today, we're kicking off Audience Choice