[Sublime + Python Setup] Don’t build “nag screen muscle memory”

Hey there,

Once I worked with a developer who refused to buy a registered copy of Sublime for months on end, even though he *loved* Sublime.

He used it as his main code editor every day and was very happy with it —

Except for that dang nag screen that would get him all worked up and angry because it "interrupted his work".

You might be familiar with this popup dialog in unlicensed copies of Sublime Text:

Image

Sublime’s free trial version has all the features of the paid version—but every couple of minutes it displays a nag screen as a reminder to upgrade to the full version.

That's a pretty fair model in my books (yes I grew up when “shareware” was still a thing).

Anyway, when I sat down for a pair programming session with this guy one day I was kind of dumbfounded by how he'd “tightly integrated” the nag screen with his coding workflow:

He’d made a habit out of typing some code, getting hit with the nag screen, groaning and letting out a curse under his breath, then smoothly dismissing the nag screen, and carrying on with this work.

And let me tell you, he’d gotten *good* at dismissing that popup… Watching him reminded me of a guitarist playing a well-rehearsed lick.

His precise and cat-like movements clearly showed that he had developed impeccable muscle memory for the task.

Now there would've been an easy fix to stop this distraction: Just shell out the $70 for a Sublime Text license and he'd been off to interruption-free programming bliss…But no, my coworker did not budge.

When I casually asked our CTO if we could get a team license for Sublime to stop this misery once and for all—he almost spat coffee all over his laptop.

Today I understand the complete look of astonishment on his face:

As an experienced developer, our CTO knew the toll those daily interruptions took on my colleague.

How they affected his creativity, his productivity… and how, by extension, they cost the company a lot of money. Much more than what a measly editor license key would cost.

We purchased a Sublime license the same afternoon.

In the end my colleague was happy to get a full version of Sublime without the nag screen. And for me a lightbulb went on and I witnessed my mindset shift…

Don't get me wrong—I *love* a frugal mindset, but sacrificing your own happiness by trying to save some money on a critical tool you use all day is always the wrong choice. Period.

Because, when you think about it, tools for developers are pretty cheap:

Other professions like architects or graphic designers have to put up with much higher software prices.

I just looked and AutoCAD costs $4,195 for a single-user license these days.

Adobe charges $899.88 for their Creative Suite per user—and that’s an annually recurring fee.

Most tools for software developers are ridiculously cheap by comparison…

And that makes them fantastic *investments*:

I found it always pays to invest in the tools that make you happy and more productive. These days I try to get the best tools I can afford to do my work.

And this strategy has served me well—both professionally and from a "developer happiness" perspective.

Remember how great it felt to automate away a task that got on your nerves for a month?

When you finally got rid of that roadblock or distraction in your workflow once and for all?

Every time I do that it feels awesome. I feel waves of joy and satisfaction rolling through my whole body. (Yes I know I’m a huge nerd.)

For Sublime Text there’s a quick way to get rid of kinks and roadblocks in your coding workflow —

You can turn it into a tool that’s going to make you smile every time you sit down at your computer to work. Get all the details in the link below:

>> Click here to make your Sublime Text experience even better

— Dan Bader

Older messages

[Python Mastery] What does it mean to "master" Python?

Wednesday, September 14, 2022

Hey there, A couple of years ago I'd become quite interested in martial arts. Hours upon hours of watching "The Karate Kid" growing up must've taken their toll on me... And so, I

[Sublime + Python Setup] why Atom can’t replace Sublime

Tuesday, September 13, 2022

Hey there, "In a nutshell, Atom is a Sublime Text editor that just got better." When I read this quote I got so worked up I nearly fell off my chair. Because every time I've tried Atom or

[Python Dependency Pitfalls] How to set the world on fire

Tuesday, September 13, 2022

Hey there, #1 on my list of dependency management pitfalls is there for a good reason: It lead to a single developer causing mayhem and breaking thousands of open-source projects around the world in

[Python Dependency Pitfalls] A total mess?

Monday, September 12, 2022

Hey there, Recently I watched a Pythonista ask for advice on setting up a Python project on his work machine. This new developer had some prior experience with NodeJS and had just started to get his

[Sublime + Python Setup] The Ctrl+s "Heisenbug"

Monday, September 12, 2022

"What the **** is going on?!" I heard Keith yell. Returning from my lunch break and in a helpful mood I grabbed my coffee mug and shuffled over to my coworker's desk. "What's

The image in this post displays its own MD5 hash — and A mysterious voice is haunting American Airlines’ in-flight announcements

Saturday, September 24, 2022

Issue #900 — Top 20 stories of September 25, 2022 Issue #900 — September 25, 2022 You receive this email because you are subscribed to Hacker News Digest. You can open it in the browser if you prefer.

Weekend Reading — 👋 0.1 + 0.2

Saturday, September 24, 2022

This week we play Dungeon & Types, visualize our designs IRL, FOMO into the Metaverse, and wrestle a bear for a Belgium waffle. Weekend Reading — 👋 0.1 + 0.2 By Assaf Arkin – 24 Sep 2022 – View

Daily Coding Problem: Problem #889 [Easy]

Saturday, September 24, 2022

Daily Coding Problem Good morning! Here's your coding interview problem for today. This problem was asked by Amazon. Run-length encoding is a fast and simple method of encoding strings. The basic

Animated | Visualizing 140 Years of Global Surface Temperatures 🌐

Saturday, September 24, 2022

Here's a look at 140 years of global surface temperatures, highlighting the ten coldest and warmest years since 1880. View Online | Subscribe Presented by: Explore what 8 billion people means for

The Best Laptops of 2022

Saturday, September 24, 2022

Did You Know?: The stethoscope was invented in 1816 by French physician René-Théophile-Hyacinthe Laennec and motivated by a desire to accurately (and modestly) diagnose heart problems in women. The

Noonification: Monsters of Mars

Saturday, September 24, 2022

Top Tech Content sent at Noon! Private Applications Begin Here How are you, @hacker? 🪐 What's happening in tech this week: The Noonification by HackerNoon has got you covered with fresh content

Week in Review - GTA 6 footage leaks, Revolut gets hacked, and Wipro fires 300 for "moonlighting"

Saturday, September 24, 2022

TechCrunch Newsletter TechCrunch logo Week in Review logo By Greg Kumparak Saturday, September 24, 2022 Hi, friends! Welcome back to Week in Review, the newsletter where we very quickly sum up the most

London Police Arrested 17-Year-Old Hacker Suspected of Uber and GTA 6 Breaches

Saturday, September 24, 2022

The Hacker News Daily Updates Newsletter cover 2022 First Half Threat Report A Semiannual Report by FortiGuard Labs Download Now Sponsored LATEST NEWS Sep 24, 2022 London Police Arrested 17-Year-Old

Startups Weekly - Tiger Global, fickle checks and the difficulty of acceleration

Saturday, September 24, 2022

TechCrunch Newsletter TechCrunch logo Startups Weekly logo By Natasha Mascarenhas Saturday, September 24, 2022 Welcome to Startups Weekly, a fresh human-first take on this week's startup news and

New Python tutorials on Real Python

Saturday, September 24, 2022

Hey there, There's always something going on over at realpython.com as far as Python tutorials go. Here's what you may have missed this past week: When Do You Use an "..." Ellipsis in