Alienated your team? Here's how to regain their trust

Alienated your team? Here's how to regain their trust | practice (split each time) | Teaching is a key skill for leaders
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June 6, 2024
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Leading the Way
Alienated your team? Here's how to regain their trust
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If a decision you've made alienates your team, step back and get curious about what they may be seeing that you're missing, explore the issue with them and apologize if need be, outlining what you've learned and what you'll do differently in the future, write executive coaches Chantal Laurie Below and Jo Ilfeld. "Invite humility into your leadership: you've been hired for your knowledge and experience, but your team can offer invaluable wisdom and perspective," they write.
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Put it into practice: If you find you must apologize for some action you've taken, be sure to listen to your team's concerns first and resist a tepid apology, such as, "I'm sorry you felt that way," write Below and Ilfeld. "Also, explicitly share what you heard and learned from follow-up conversations to demonstrate your desire to grow and improve."
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Teaching is a key skill for leaders
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Lighthouse Consulting founder Larry Robertson asserts that the intelligence required for teaching should be celebrated in the workforce as one of eight key forms of human intelligence proposed by psychologist Robert Gardner. Leaders should remember that although "more traditionally emphasized forms of intelligence matter a great deal, teaching is the connector intelligence," Robertson writes.
Full Story: SmartBrief/Leadership (6/5) 
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Put it into practice: Teaching helps communicate culture and practice in business. "Both by their elevated position and the very nature of their role in organizations, senior leaders ... have a vital role to play [in] being a teacher, not just a leader, and enabling others to do the same," Robertson writes.
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Receiving negative feedback as a leader can be challenging, but reframing feedback as opportunities for growth can remove the emotional response, leadership coach Bill Pullen writes. Leaders who show a healthy response to feedback also model how other workers in the organization should respond when they receive feedback that has a sting.
Full Story: Cultivating Leadership blog (6/5) 
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Put it into practice: Take a deep breath before responding to feedback from a place of emotional hurt. "It's a natural human tendency to feel defensive or threatened when our self-perception is challenged," Pullen says.
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In Their Own Words
Create a sense of connection among your team by being curious and empathetic and asking questions that show you want to hear from them and that you value what they have to say, says Riaz Meghji, human connection speaker and author. "Now more than ever, it's important to double down on these aspects, on these touch points where people feel, 'I can still speak up. My voice is still going to be heard. My leaders care about me,'" Riaz says.
Full Story: Betterworks (6/4) 
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Daily Diversion
Team creates way to test snake venom without animals
(Pixabay)
A Dutch research team has introduced a 3D model called an "organ-on-a-chip" to study snake venom's impact on blood vessels, aiming to reduce animal testing, according to a study in Scientific Reports. Research shows how different venoms affect blood vessels, with some destroying cell membranes and others breaking down molecular bonds, but the toxin could serve as a source for potential medical breakthroughs.
Full Story: Popular Science (6/4) 
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SmartBreak: Question of the Day
If Martti Malmi didn't sell his 5,050 BTC bitcoins in 2009, they'd be worth well over $250 million today. How much did he sell them for back then?
Vote$1.50
Vote$5.02
Vote$105
Vote$5,050
About The Editor
Candace Chellew
Candace Chellew
Chellew
I was in my late teens when I landed my first radio news reporter job. My news director was five years older than me, but he had also been doing the job for at least five years longer than I had. I was pretty green, and more frequently than not, he would shove my news copy back across the desk and bark, "Rewrite it."

That was the extent of his feedback. I would ask questions, and he would clarify a few things, but honestly, going back to my typewriter (yes, you read that right) and taking a fresh approach helped me become both a better news writer and a writer in general.

His guidance helped in some way, because years later, when I was in the main newsroom at CNN writing news copy, I learned to love feedback even more. After I wrote my story, I would follow it to the copy desk and watch as they hacked and slashed my story until it looked nothing like the original. I asked for specific feedback and heeded it until I could send almost completely clean copy to the editors.

Getting angry or defensive when someone offers you good, honest feedback only hurts you. My first editor's gruff feedback and the slash-and-burn editing of CNN editors probably would have discouraged me if I hadn't been determined to impress them in some way and get better in the process.

You should disregard any feedback meant to discourage or hurt you. It's easy to tell the difference. Those offering undercutting feedback will make you feel small. Those who intend to help you improve will offer advice to reveal the potential in yourself that they see and want you to bring forward. Be thankful for them!

If this newsletter helps you, please tell your colleagues, friends or anyone who can benefit. Forward them this email, or send this link.

What topics do you see in your daily work that I should know about? Do you have praise? Criticism? Drop me a note. And don't forget to send me photos of your pets, your office and where you spend your time off.
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Thank you to the people who didn't believe in me. To those who thought they were putting water on my fire, you were really adding gas to it.
Coco Gauff,
professional tennis player
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