What to do when a misstep leaves you on thin ice

What to do when a misstep leaves you on thin ice | practice (split each time) | Create a respectful culture to keep talent on board
Created for you  |  Unknown Title at Unknown Company
For more relevant content - Update Your Profile  |  Web Version
April 24, 2024
CONNECT WITH SMARTBRIEF LinkedInFacebookX
SmartBrief on Leadership
Innovative Ideas. Ahead of the Curve.SIGN UP ⋅   SHARE
ADVERTISEMENT
Leading the Way
What to do when a misstep leaves you on thin ice
(wakr10/Getty Images)
If you've made a grave mistake as a leader and you find your career in jeopardy, instead of taking action in haste, executive coach Ed Batista advises slowing down, taking stock of the situation, finding a coach to help you navigate the challenges and understanding it will take time to recover. "In particular, be prepared for some vestige of this episode to cling to your reputation and to face repeated reminders, implied or explicit, that you were once on thin ice," Batista advises.
Full Story: Ed Batista Executive Coaching (4/23) 
LinkedIn X Facebook Email
Put it into practice: It's important to grow from serious missteps in your career, including learning resilience, emotional regulation and the ability to learn from failures and mistakes, Batista notes. Preparing for the worst -- such as hiring outside legal counsel if necessary -- is also recommended by Batista.
SmartBrief on Leadership
Create a respectful culture to keep talent on board
(xavierarnau/Getty Images)
Data shows that retaining and engaging employees is paramount for executives, which is good since other research reveals few employees are engaged, and many may be eyeing the exit, says S. Chris Edmonds. Employees want to be respected and validated, Edmonds notes, which means leaders must model the behavior, celebrate team success and coach workers on cultural behavior norms.
Full Story: SmartBrief/Leadership (4/23) 
LinkedIn X Facebook Email
Put it into practice: It's up to senior leaders to model the respect and validation their employees crave and create a culture where such behavior is expected, Edmonds says. "When respect and validation are the foundation of your work culture, retention, engagement and recruitment organically follow."
Read more from S. Chris Edmonds on SmartBrief on Leadership
Smarter Communication
Discovering whether a colleague really values the work they do involves deeper probing than a simple question that elicits only a one-word answer. "Yes and no questions seldom give us much information that's really useful," writes Tom Foster in his "Management Blog," noting that it's better to ask about the task the colleague is doing.
Full Story: Management Blog (Tom Foster) (4/22) 
LinkedIn X Facebook Email
Put it into practice: Foster says questions that will ascertain how much a colleague values their work might include: Before we ship this product to the customer, what is the most important thing we have to remember? When the customer receives this product, what is the most important thing they look for? and When you look around at your team mates, thinking about their work, what do you find most helpful to you?
Free eBooks and Resources
Free eBooks and resources brought to you by our sponsors
Smarter A.I.
A weekly spotlight on how A.I. is affecting leadership
In Their Own Words
Mark Tuitert, a speed skater who won a gold medal at the 2010 Vancouver Winter Olympics, follows the wisdom of the Stoics to focus on making the right choices, looking out for the interest of your team and building character, traits he outlines in his book, "The Stoic Mindset: Living the Ten Principles of Stoicism." "In all areas, from sports to politics to business, individuals and teams demonstrate that success doesn't have to come at the expense of others. The quest for character is the quest for a good life," Tuitert writes.
Full Story: Fast Company (tiered subscription model) (4/21) 
LinkedIn X Facebook Email
Daily Diversion
The top 4 guitar riffs music store employees hate
(Pixabay)
When aspiring guitarists want to sound impressive, the riffs they search the web for most often are "Seven Nation Army" by The White Strips, "Stairway to Heaven" by Led Zepplin, "Come As You Are," by Nirvana and Metallica's "Nothing Else Matters" coming in fourth along with three more of their songs in the top 20, according to an analysis by Wood and Fire Studio. "The first four songs are played so often that the staff in the guitar departments of music stores can no longer hear them," said the researchers.
Full Story: Guitar World (4/22) 
LinkedIn X Facebook Email
SmartBreak: Question of the Day
Which of these programming languages got its name from the comedy troupe Monty Python?
VoteC++
VoteGNU
VotePython
VoteRust
Pets of SmartBrief Leaders
Everybody loves Charlie!
Everybody loves Charlie!
(Robert S.)
Robert S. sent in this photo of his beloved Charlie Freckles. Robert's family adopted him after he was dumped out on an Alabama road.

"The guy that found him was not able to keep him so we brought him home," Robert writes. "He was a little nervous during the car ride. But when we walked into the kitchen and he saw our three other dogs he wagged his tail and was so happy. He is our only pet now. He is so good and friendly. Everyone in the neighborhood loves Charlie."

It's easy to see why!

What non-human companions do you spend your day with or who greet you when you get home? Send me their photos to share!
LinkedIn X Facebook Email
About The Editor
Candace Chellew
Candace Chellew
Chellew

As a guitar player, I frequently find myself in music stores. There's always one guy in the acoustic room playing "Blackbird" by The Beatles, and out in the electric guitar and bass area, there are usually a few wailing out "Stairway to Heaven," "Seven Nation Army," or "Crazy Train." I always feel sorry for the employees, but maybe they've become immune to the cacophony around them. 

The data on the most played guitar riffs reminds me of a leadership tip. What's your favorite riff when you're in front of a crowd? Are you constantly using the same stories, the same examples or the same kinds of phrases? If so, like those music store employees, your team may be tuning you out.

Try switching up your riffs. Learn a new story, example or phrase. I'm sure the music store staff perks up when someone plays something they haven't heard in a while -- or when someone comes in a plays an entirely new riff they've written.

If you find yourself riffing -- quoting others over and over -- it's time to start digging into your leadership wisdom and offering up new ideas that come from your experience and not the borrowed experiences of others. That will get your team rockin'!

If this newsletter helps you, please tell your colleagues, friends or anyone who can benefit. Forward them this email, or send this link.

What topics do you see in your daily work that I should know about? Do you have praise? Criticism? Drop me a note. And don't forget to send me photos of your pets, your office and where you spend your time off.
LinkedIn X Facebook Email
Sharing SmartBrief on Leadership with your network keeps the quality of content high and these newsletters free.
Help Spread the Word
SHARE
Or copy and share your personalized link:
smartbrief.com/leadership/?referrerId=ozrlmJyztp
It's hard to remake decisions and even harder to rethink nondecisions.
Katharine Graham,
newspaper publisher
LinkedIn X Facebook Email
 
SmartBrief publishes more than 200 free industry newsletters - Browse our portfolio
Sign Up  |    Update Profile  |    Advertise with SmartBrief
Unsubscribe  |    Privacy policy
CONTACT US: FEEDBACK  |    ADVERTISE
SmartBrief Future
Copyright © 2024 SmartBrief. All Rights Reserved.
A division of Future US LLC
Full 7th Floor, 130 West 42nd Street, New York, NY, 10036.

Older messages

6 ways to thrive in a big career transition

Tuesday, April 23, 2024

Should your job be the source of your passion? | practice (split each time) | 6 ways to thrive in a big career transition Created for newsletterest1@gmail.com | Unknown Title at Unknown Company For

New leaders need 2 traits -- and both can be learned

Monday, April 22, 2024

New leaders need 2 traits -- and both can be learned | practice (split each time) | Use these best practices to avoid new leader burnout Created for newsletterest1@gmail.com | Unknown Title at Unknown

We're all biased. Here's how to not let bias rule you

Friday, April 19, 2024

We're all biased. Here's how to not let bias rule you | practice (split each time) | Make employee rewards personal and regular to resonate Created for newsletterest1@gmail.com | Unknown Title

Spotlight On: A CEO's guide to scaling GEN AI

Thursday, April 18, 2024

Spotlight On: A CEOs Guide to Scaling Gen AI | Three roles CEOs need to play to scale Gen AI | Dive into the latest on Generative AI Created for newsletterest1@gmail.com | Web Version April 18, 2024

Why you need some "Debbie Downers" to rein in optimists

Thursday, April 18, 2024

Why you need some "Debbie Downers" to rein in optimists | practice (split each time) | 4 leadership anxiety traps and how to avoid them Created for newsletterest1@gmail.com | Unknown Title at

You Might Also Like

Weekly Jobs Update - 23 May, 2024

Thursday, May 23, 2024

New jobs at Gauntlet, Lightcurve, Chiliz, Avara, Clearmatics, Chronicle Labs, Hype, Auditless, Outlier Ventures, Oak Security, Logos, Subspace Labs, P2P.org, ZetaChain ͏ ͏ ͏ ͏ ͏ ͏ ͏ ͏ ͏ ͏ ͏ ͏ ͏ ͏ ͏ ͏ ͏

NoDesk: Issue #319

Thursday, May 23, 2024

A weekly newsletter with the best new remote jobs, stories and ideas from the remote work community, and occasional offbeat pieces to feed your curiosity. By Daniel (@nodeskco). Remote Jobs 100000s of

5 ways to make changes without disrupting your team

Thursday, May 23, 2024

How to bounce back when trauma affects your workplace | practice (split each time) | 5 ways to make changes without disrupting your team Created for newsletterest1@gmail.com | Unknown Title at Unknown

Want to keep employees? Write great job descriptions

Wednesday, May 22, 2024

Do these 3 things as a new manager to build trust | practice (split each time) | Want to keep employees? Write great job descriptions Created for newsletterest1@gmail.com | Unknown Title at Unknown

4 Companies with a 4 Day Week 🔥

Tuesday, May 21, 2024

Plus: the most in-demand career right now (imo) and how to get started in it...͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌

[Arbinger Research Report] The hidden force impacting team performance

Tuesday, May 21, 2024

Research-backed culture insights to accelerate organizational effectiveness. Created for newsletterest1@gmail.com | Web Version This is a paid advertisement for SmartBrief readers. The content does not

100 Easy Ways You Can Make Extra Cash This Summer

Tuesday, May 21, 2024

Hey, Oddies. Jen Glantz here. Been thinking about ways to earn some extra cash this summer. I'm in full summer cleaning mode. Every night, from 7-9pm, I organize some part of our apartment. Even

Bosses Quit Over Office Return Policies 🫡

Tuesday, May 21, 2024

This week you'll learn why bosses are quitting more over RTO policies, jobs search tools to help you get employed, & all the latest remote jobs. Here are a few tools we think employers should

Make it safe for everyone to speak during meetings

Tuesday, May 21, 2024

If you're a "go it alone" kind of leader, failure looms | practice (split each time) | Make it safe for everyone to speak during meetings Created for newsletterest1@gmail.com | Unknown

Unlock your strategic HR power at SHRM24!

Monday, May 20, 2024

Master strategic planning with the SHRM24 Strategic HR content track Created for newsletterest1@gmail.com | Web Version This is a paid advertisement for SmartBrief readers. The content does not